Question: What Did The Treaty Promise?

Who settled New Zealand First?

Abel TasmanThe first European to arrive in New Zealand was the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642..

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

What the Treaty of Waitangi means to me?

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document of our country. Maori agreed: to let other people live in their country; and. to let the British make rules about behaviour and see that everyone obeys them.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

What happened after the Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

What were the British intentions for the Treaty of Waitangi?

English version – British intentions were to: Protect Māori interests from the encroaching British settlement; Provide for British settlement; and Establish a government to maintain peace and order.

Why did the British want New Zealand?

Britain was motivated by the desire to forestall the New Zealand Company and other European powers (France established a very small settlement at Akaroa in the South Island later in 1840), to facilitate settlement by British subjects and, possibly, to end the lawlessness of European (predominantly British and American) …

What impact did the Treaty of Waitangi have?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

Who broke the Treaty of Waitangi?

It may have been practically unknown to the hundreds of thousands of settlers who flooded in to New Zealand to ‘open up’ the country. By the end of the 1870s Māori were outnumbered 10 to one by the European population. Breaches of Māori rights under the treaty escalated as settlement extended across the North Island.

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori. At the same time, the Treaty gave the Crown the right to govern New Zealand and to represent the interests of all New Zealanders.

Why is the Treaty important?

Treaties form the basis of most parts of modern international law. They serve to satisfy a fundamental need of States to regulate by consent issues of common concern, and thus to bring stability into their mutual relations.

Why did NZ need a treaty?

Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.

What was NZ like before the treaty?

The history of Māori migration and settlement in Aotearoa and the stories of Te Ao Māori (The Māori World) have been retained in the oral histories of each iwi (tribe) and hapu (sub-tribe). Histories of the Māori people are told in the creation stories.

Does England own Australia?

Formally speaking, Australia is a constitutional monarchy, which means the Queen is the head of state. According to the royal family’s website, when the Queen visits Australia, she speaks and acts as Queen of Australia, and not as Queen of the United Kingdom.

Is NZ still a British colony?

A century after New Zealand proclaimed itself a loyal Dominion of the British Empire, the country is still technically a “dominion”, or self-governing colony, say legal experts. … Only in 1947 did New Zealand agree, the last dominion to do so.

What were the consequences of the treaty?

The Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, and officially ended the war between Germany and the Allied Powers. The controversial War Guilt clause blamed Germany for World War I and imposed heavy debt payments on Germany.

What if there was no Treaty of Waitangi?

So: what if there had been no Treaty of Waitangi? … Another easy answer is that with no treaty there would be no argument about whether, in signing the treaty, iwi ceded sovereignty, as the English version says. In the te reo version they didn’t.

Who was against the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi.