Quick Answer: What Are Obsessive Thoughts Examples?

Do I have intrusive thoughts?

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, intrusive thoughts are among the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

They can also be a feature of anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Intrusive thoughts are unwanted thoughts that seem to occur out of the blue..

What are examples of intrusive thoughts?

Let’s look at a few different types of intrusive thoughts, and what they might mean.Thinking about hurting yourself or someone else. Sometimes intrusive thoughts can be violent. … Intrusive sexual thoughts. … Negative self-talk. … Delusional thoughts. … Other intrusive thoughts.

Are obsessive thoughts normal?

Even if you are of sound mind and free of any serious mental health issues, it’s possible to be struck by intrusive thoughts out of nowhere – and this is not something you should feel too concerned about. If you only have periodic intrusive thoughts and have no urge to act on them, this is completely normal.

What are unwanted intrusive thoughts?

Unwanted intrusive thoughts are stuck thoughts that cause great distress. They seem to come from out of nowhere, arrive with a whoosh, and cause a great deal of anxiety. The content of unwanted intrusive thoughts often focuses on sexual or violent or socially unacceptable images.

What are obsessive thoughts a symptom of?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) features a pattern of unwanted thoughts and fears (obsessions) that lead you to do repetitive behaviors (compulsions). These obsessions and compulsions interfere with daily activities and cause significant distress.

What is an example of an obsession?

Common compulsive behaviors in OCD include: Excessive double-checking of things, such as locks, appliances, and switches. Repeatedly checking in on loved ones to make sure they’re safe. Counting, tapping, repeating certain words, or doing other senseless things to reduce anxiety. Spending a lot of time washing or …

How do you get rid of obsessive thoughts?

To accept obsessive thoughts, plant yourself firmly in the present and be realistic about what you do and do not have control over. “When you find yourself obsessing about the past or worrying about the future, ask yourself the following question: ‘Can I do anything about this right now? ‘” says Jodee Virgo.

What is the best medication for obsessive thoughts?

Antidepressants approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat OCD include:Clomipramine (Anafranil) for adults and children 10 years and older.Fluoxetine (Prozac) for adults and children 7 years and older.Fluvoxamine for adults and children 8 years and older.Paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva) for adults only.More items…•

Can intrusive thoughts go away?

Everyone gets intrusive thoughts, but having them doesn’t mean you have OCD. For people who do have OCD, these thoughts can be debilitating, causing extreme anxiety and discomfort. No matter how hard you try to get rid of them, they won’t go away. Having intrusive thoughts does not make you a bad person.

What are considered obsessive thoughts?

Obsessive thoughts can include: Worries about yourself or other people getting hurt. Constant awareness of blinking, breathing, or other body sensations. Suspicion that a partner is unfaithful, with no reason to believe it.

What is the most common obsession?

The most common obsessions are worries that something is “contaminated” which results in excessive avoidance or excessive washing.

How can I stop unwanted thoughts?

Try one of these two techniques:Set a timer, watch, or other alarm for 3 minutes. Then focus on your unwanted thought. … Instead of using a timer, you can tape-record yourself shouting “Stop!” at intervals of 3 minutes, 2 minutes, and 1 minute. Do the thought-stopping exercise.

What are the 4 types of OCD?

Types of OCDChecking.Contamination / Mental Contamination.Symmetry and ordering.Ruminations / Intrusive Thoughts.Hoarding.

Why do I think horrible thoughts?

The two most common diagnoses associated with intrusive thoughts are anxiety and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). They can also be a symptom of depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Bipolar Disorder, or Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

How do I control OCD intrusive thoughts?

Here are 7 things you can do to help you not react negatively to intrusive thoughts that come up.Understand Why Intrusive Thoughts Disturb You. … Attend the Intrusive Thoughts. … Don’t Fear the Thoughts. … Take Intrusive Thoughts Less Personally. … Stop Changing Your Behaviors.More items…•